Bonus Chapter 1: Earlier iPod and iPhone Models and Connections

The iPod family has grown by several generations as of this writing. Today’s iPod and iPhone models work with iTunes on either Windows computers or Macs, but that wasn’t always the case. The first-generation iPods worked only with Macs. In 2002, Apple introduced the second generation — one version for Windows and another for the Mac, using the same design for both. For the third generation (2003), Apple changed the design once again.

Models of every generation since then — as well as offshoots, such as iPod mini, iPod nano, and iPod shuffle — work with either Windows or Mac and come in a variety of hard drive or flash memory sizes. One way to tell what kind of iPod you have is by its navigational controls. Older models use a scrolling wheel, a touch pad, or a touch wheel, whereas the newest models use a click wheel or multitouch display.

For a nifty chart that shows the differences among iPod models, see the Identifying Different iPod Models page on the Apple Web site.

Tip: Second-generation and third-generation iPod models can be synchronized with a Windows PC using MusicMatch Jukebox version 7.5, which was provided on CD-ROM with some second-generation models before iTunes became available for Windows. However, a newer version of this software, renamed Yahoo! Music Jukebox, doesn’t work directly with iPods.

First-Generation iPods

Apple doesn’t sell first-generation iPods anymore, but you might see a few on eBay. More likely, their proud owners are Mac users who still find them useful. Despite its original price tag ($399), which was pricey compared to other MP3 players, the first iPod (with 5GB of storage space) was an unqualified success when it was introduced in October 2001. Apple sold more than 125,000 units within 60 days. “Listening to music will never be the same again,” Apple CEO Steve Jobs told the press at the introduction of the first iPod, and boy, was he right! Months later, Apple introduced the 10GB model.

First-generation iPods work only with Macs, connecting to a Mac with a standard FireWire/IEEE 1394 cable. The first generation offers a distinctive scroll wheel that physically turns with your finger as you use it. These early iPods are hefty at 6.5 ounces and have a stainless-steel back and dual-plastic top casing.

Tech Tip: FireWire is called IEEE 1394 by the engineers who designed it and DV terminal by camcorder manufacturers that use it — except for Sony, which calls it i.Link.

These models don’t offer all the features of newer generations and can’t be used with accessories that are designed for newer generations. First-generation models can’t be updated to newer versions of the iPod software, so they also lack support for features such as setting up an On-The-Go playlist. However, battery life is comparable to newer models, offering up to eight hours before requiring a recharge. (For more about battery life, see Chapter 1 of iPod and iTunes For Dummies.)

The main menu for first-generation iPods offers the following selections:

  • Playlists: Select a playlist to play.
  • Browse: Select music by playlist, artist, album, song, genre, or composer; or select an audio book.
  • Extras: View and set the clock and alarm clock, view contacts, view your calendar, view notes, and play games.
  • Settings: Set display settings, menu settings, the backlight timer, the clicker, and the date and time.
  • Backlight: Turn the backlighting on or off for the iPod display.
  • Now Playing: This selection appears only when a song is playing — it takes you to the Now Playing display.

Second-Generation iPods

Apple introduced a second-generation design in the form of two models: the 20GB iPod for the Mac and the 10GB for Windows. The Windows model of the second generation shipped with MusicMatch Jukebox. Apple doesn’t sell either model anymore either, but you might find a used one on the Internet.

Second-generation models use an innovative solid-state touch wheel that doesn’t physically turn as you use it; instead, it responds to finger pressure. These models use a FireWire connection to connect to the computer with a six-pin FireWire cable.

Second-generation models can’t be updated to version 2 or newer versions of the iPod software, so they don’t offer all the features of newer generations; and they can’t be used with dock-connector and voice recorder accessories designed for newer models. Although standard FireWire accessories (such as power adapters for automobiles) are available for these models, digital camera accessories such as memory card readers are not available as of this writing.

The main menu for second-generation iPods offers the following selections:

  • Playlists: Select a playlist to play.
  • Browse: Select music by playlist, artist, album, song, genre, or composer; or select an audio book.
  • Extras: View and set the clock and alarm clock, view contacts, view your calendar, view notes, and play games.
  • Settings: Set display settings, menu settings, the backlight timer, the clicker, and the date and time.
  • Backlight: Turn the backlighting on or off for the iPod display.
  • Now Playing: This selection appears only when a song is playing @@md it takes you to the Now Playing display.

 

Third-Generation iPods

The third-generation models include the 10GB, 15GB, and 30GB models introduced in 2003, and the 20GB and 40GB models introduced later in that same year. All have been discontinued. All third-generation models share the same basic features and work with a Mac or in Windows, and Apple continually provides software updates for these models.

Models of the third generation are thinner than the second generation and use touch-sensitive buttons with audible feedback (replacing the pressure-sensitive buttons of the second generation that offer tactile feedback). The touch-sensitive buttons above the scroll wheel perform simple functions when you touch them.

Third-generation models also use a dock connector to connect to a computer or power supply. The dock keeps your iPod in an upright position while connected and lets you connect a home stereo or headphones. This makes the dock convenient as a base station when you’re not traveling with your iPod because you can slip the iPod into the dock without connecting cables.

The supplied cables connect to the dock on one end (or to an iPod itself if you don’t use a dock) and connect to a computer or power supply on the other end, using standard FireWire or USB 2.0 connections. USB (Universal Serial Bus) is a widely used hardware interface for attaching peripheral devices. Nearly all PCs and all Macs offer USB 2.0 connections, but some older PCs offer only USB 1.1, which you can use to synchronize or transfer content to your iPod but not to provide power to the iPod. Some third-generation models included a FireWire cable but didn’t include the USB cable in the box. You can order one from the Apple Store or get one on eBay.

Tip: Third-generation full-size iPod models don’t support USB 2.0 on the Mac; you must use FireWire.

Third-generation models offer the following menu selections:

  • Music: Select music by playlist, artist, album, song, genre, or composer; or select an audio book.
  • Playlists: Select a playlist to play.
  • Extras: View and set the clock and alarm clock; view contacts, your calendar, or notes; and play games.
  • Settings: Set display settings, menu settings, the backlight timer, the clicker, and the date and time.
  • Backlight: Turn the backlighting on or off for the iPod display.
  • Now Playing: This selection appears only when a song is playing @@md it takes you to the Now Playing display.

 

iPod mini

iPod mini, an offshoot of the third generation, is small enough to fit in a shirt pocket. Its smooth, ultra-thin, anodized aluminum case came in five different colors. Apple has phased out iPod mini (replaced essentially by iPod nano). The original model houses a 4GB drive that can hold about 1,000 songs — as much as the original 5GB model. Newer models sported a 6GB drive that holds about 1,500 songs.

iPod mini can fit more songs in the same amount of space because Apple introduced a better compression format — namely, Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) — in second-generation models. The AAC format can also be used in older models. When Apple introduced AAC, the capacity of all models increased. See Bonus Chapter 2 for more information about AAC.

Besides its smaller size (and therefore, smaller dock), another of iPod mini’s distinguishing characteristics is the click wheel, which offers the same functions as the third-generation iPod touch wheel but is more suitable for such a small device. The click wheel combines the scroll wheel and buttons, with pressure-sensitive buttons underneath the top, bottom, left, and right areas of the circular pad of the wheel.

iPod mini has the same features as full-size third-generation iPods except that it uses a different set of accessories because of its size, and it offers up to 18 hours of battery time between charges.

The main menu for the iPod mini offers the following selections:

  • Playlists: Select a playlist to play.
  • Browse: Select music by playlist, artist, album, song, genre, or composer; or select an audio book.
  • Extras: View and set the clock and alarm clock, view contacts, view your calendar, view notes, and play games.
  • Settings: Set display settings, menu settings, the backlight timer, the clicker, and the date and time.
  • Backlight: Turn the backlighting on or off for the iPod display.
  • Now Playing: This selection appears only when a song is playing @@md it takes you to the Now Playing display.

 

Fourth-Generation and Color-Display iPods

In 2004, Apple introduced a fourth-generation iPod that uses the same click wheel and buttons that the iPod mini uses. Fourth-generation iPod software includes the ability to randomly shuffle song playback with the press of a button and to charge the iPod through the USB connection to your computer. The fourth-generation iPods were at first available in 40GB and 20GB models with black-and-white displays. Later in 2004, Apple offered 30GB and 60GB models (known as iPod photo) with color displays that could store photos and display slide shows. The fifth- and sixth-generation models replaced the fourth generation, but you can find these in some stores and find used ones on the Internet.

The fourth-generation units with black-and-white displays offer up to 12 hours of battery time between charges. You can play up to 15 hours of continuous music on a color-display iPod between charges or up to five hours of continuous slide shows with music. The battery is the same type as those used in other models; the improvement is in how the software manages power in the iPod. Like third-generation iPods, the fourth generation also uses a dock connector to connect the iPod to a computer or power supply, and the dock itself is available separately from the Apple Store. The fourth-generation iPods connect to computers via either FireWire or USB cables.

Fourth-generation iPod models differ from earlier models by offering a top-level Music choice on the main menu and the ability to create multiple On-The-Go playlists. You can also play audio books at slower or faster speeds while maintaining natural-sounding pitch.

The iPod color-display models of the fourth generation let you store and view color digital photos as well as store and play sound. These models also do everything a fourth-generation iPod can do and use the same accessories. When Apple first offered them, they were supplied with a Universal Dock that included an S-Video connection, and the Apple Remote for controlling it. Apple offered a 20GB model and a 60GB model that can hold up to 15,000 songs and full-color album cover art (or as many as 25,000 photos).

The 60GB iPod with color display uses the same click wheel and buttons that iPod mini uses. The color display provides crisp definition for the iPod’s menus, making them easier to read, even in sunlight.

The iPod color display, at 220 x 176-pixel resolution and more than 65,000 colors, offers excellent viewing with built-in backlighting. With the optional AV cable, you can connect the iPod to a television monitor or video projector for a video-quality slide show. It even optimizes your photos to fit on a standard (4:3 ratio) or widescreen (16:9 ratio) TV.

The iPod main menu for fourth-generation models and iPod nano is the same as fifth-generation models but without the Videos selection.

The Fifth-, Sixth-, and Seventh-Generation iPod classic

In late 2005, Apple introduced a new generation of iPod that plays video along with music and photos. The fifth-generation iPod is a bit slimmer than the previous generation, while adding a generous 2.5-inch color display that offers remarkable picture clarity for video content.

All fifth-generation iPods use the same click wheel and buttons as the fourth-generation models, combining the scroll wheel with pressure-sensitive buttons underneath the top, bottom, left, and right areas of the circular pad of the wheel, as shown in Figure BC1-3. Apple offered a slim, 4.8-ounce 30GB model and a 5.5-ounce 80GB model, which are still available in electronics stores.

The 30GB model holds about 7,500 songs or about 40 hours of video, and its battery offers up to 14 hours of music playback, 4 hours of slide shows with music, or 3.5 hours of video playback. The 80GB model holds about 20,000 songs or about 100 hours of video, and its battery offers up to 20 hours of music playback, 6 hours of slide shows with music, or 6.5 hours of video playback. Both models hold up to 25,000 photos.

The 60GB fifth-generation iPod, offered in 2005, holds about 15,000 songs or about 150 hours of video, and its battery offers up to 20 hours of music playback, 4 hours of slide shows with music, or 3 hours of video playback.

You can put videos on your fifth-generation iPod by using iTunes. You can even get some of your favorite TV shows, plus music videos and full-length movies, directly from the iTunes Store. The color display provides crisp definition for the iPod’s menus, making them easier to read, even in sunlight. The iPod color display, at 320 x 240-pixel resolution and more than 65,000 colors, offers excellent viewing with built-in backlighting. With the optional AV cable, you can connect the iPod to a television monitor or video projector to show videos and slide shows. It even optimizes your photos to fit on a standard (4:3 ratio) or widescreen (16:9 ratio) TV.

Like third- and fourth-generation iPods, the fifth generation also uses a cable with a dock connector on one end (which you’d use to connect either to the iPod itself or to a dock housing an iPod) and a USB connector on the other end to connect to a computer or power supply. The dock itself is available separately from the Apple Store. The dock keeps your iPod in an upright position while connected and lets you connect a home stereo or headphones. This makes the dock convenient as a base station when you’re not traveling with your iPod because you can slip the iPod into the dock without connecting cables.

The sixth- and seventh-generation iPod models were slimmed down and renamed the iPod classic. Like third-, fourth-, and fifth-generation iPods, the sixth- and seventh- generations also use a dock adapter cable to connect it to a computer or power supply. You can also use an Apple or third-party dock, and use the dock adapter cable to connect the dock to your computer or power supply.

 

The Original and Second-Generation iPhone and iPod touch

Apple shook the world in late 2007 by introducing the iPod touch and iPhone, and then revised these models in 2008. When Apple made the first iPhone available on June 29, 2007, lines formed around the block at the Apple stores as eager early adopters bought out all inventories. The iPhone was the first device to incorporate Apple’s innovative touch-sensitive display, and formed the basis for the design of the iPod touch.

The iPhone originally came in 4G and 8G models that offer Wi-Fi and AT&T’s Edge data service. Its built-in rechargeable lithium ion battery offers up to 8 hours of talk time (250 hours on standby), up to six hours browsing the Internet or seven hours playing video, and up to 24 hours playing music. It also offers Bluetooth for using wireless headphones and microphones.

The iPod touch shares the design characteristics and many of the features of the iPhone, including the multitouch display and Wi-Fi Internet connectivity. For its first and second generation products, Apple offered 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB models. First-generation iPod touch and iPhone models can run Version 3.1.3 of iOS (the iPhone operating system). Newer models can run Version 4.

I cover the newer model iPod touch and iPhone models in iPod and iTunes For Dummies (Wiley Publishing).

Five Generations of iPod nano

The first- and second-generation iPod nano models are pencil-thin and weigh only about 1.4 ounces, but packed into these mini-marvels are 1.5-inch color LCDs that crisply display the iPod menus and album artwork. At one time, Apple offered a 1GB model that holds about 240 songs, a 2GB model that holds about 500 songs, a 4GB model that holds about 1,000 songs, and an 8GB model that holds about 2,000 songs. Each model offers a battery that can play up to 24 hours of music or 5 hours of photo slide shows with music. Many of these models are still available in stores.

Nicknamed “the fatty” by Apple fans, the third-generation iPod nano, pencil thin and a little over two inches wide by less than three inches high, weighs only 1.74 ounces but packs a punch: video (as well as music, podcasts, and audio books). This mini marvel offers a 2-inch color LCD display that crisply displays video, iPod menus and album artwork. Apple offered a 4GB model that holds about 1,000 songs or up to 4 hours of video (or 3,500 photos), and an 8GB model that holds about 2,000 songs or up to 8 hours of video (or 7,000 photos). Each model offers a battery that can play up to 24 hours of music — all day and all night — or 4 hours of video.

The fourth-generation iPod nano, pencil thin and only one-and-a-half inches wide by three-and-a-half inches high, weighs only 1.3 ounces. Its curved, all-aluminum design and fine array of colors made it the most fashionable iPod at that time. It also offers a 2-inch color LCD display that crisply shows iPod menus, album artwork, and video, but this time in either vertical or horizontal orientation, and includes a motion sensor so that you can rotate it quickly to change orientation, and shake it to shuffle songs. Apple offered an 8GB model that holds about 2,000 songs or up to 8 hours of video (or 7,000 photos), and a 16GB model that holds about 4,000 songs or up to 16 hours of video (or 14,000 photos). Each model offers a battery that can play up to 24 hours of music — all day and all night — or 4 hours of video.

The fifth-generation iPod nano includes a video camera for shooting videos, and a motion sensor — you can shake it to shuffle your songs. Pencil thin and only 1.5 inches wide by 3.6 inches high, and weighing only 1.28 ounces, this mini marvel offers a 2.2-inch color LCD that crisply shows iPod menus, album artwork, and video in either vertical or horizontal orientation, and includes a motion sensor so that you can rotate it quickly to change orientation. Apple offered an 8GB model that holds about 2,000 songs or up to 8 hours of video (or 7,000 photos) and a 16GB model that holds about 4,000 songs or up to 16 hours of video (or 14,000 photos). The fifth-generation iPod nano models also include a video camera and a built-in microphone, as well as an FM tuner for listening to radio and a pedometer to keep track of your footsteps. Each model offers a battery that can play up to 24 hours of music — all day and all of the night — or 5 hours of video.

Unlike the smaller iPod shuffle, these iPod nano generations are full-featured iPods with loads of accessories tailored specifically for it. The third- and fourth-generation iPod nano models use the same style of click wheel and buttons as the first- and second-generation iPod nano (and other fifth- and sixth-generation iPod classic models). It also uses a dock connector to connect to a computer or power supply.

 

Three Generations of iPod shuffle

The first iPod shuffle is 3.3 inches long, less than 1 inch wide, and about one-third of an inch thick. It weighs only 0.78 ounce, which is little more than a car key or a pack of gum. You can hang it from your ears with the supplied earbuds and wear it around your neck like a necklace. You can still find first-generation iPod shuffles for sale in retail outlets and used ones on eBay, but Apple replaced the original with the much smaller clip-on model.

The first iPod shuffle, at 512MB, holds 120 songs, assuming an average of 4 minutes per song, using the AAC format at the High Quality setting (see Bonus Chapter 2 for more information about the AAC format). Its battery offers up to 12 hours of power between charges. Apple also offered a 1GB version that holds 240 songs.

The first iPod shuffle connects like a USB thumb drive to your computer. Underneath the cap on the tip of the original iPod shuffle model is a convenient connector that plugs the iPod shuffle into a computer’s USB connection to acquire power for recharging its battery. You don’t need a separate cable and there is no dock for it.

The second iPod shuffle was offered in two models: 1GB or 2GB. This 0.55-ounce model is shaped like a money clip and is about the same size — 1.07 x 1.62 inches with a depth of 0.41 inch. In several different flashy colors and convenient for clipping to just about anything, this iPod shuffle was a fashion statement in its heyday.

The 1GB iPod shuffle holds about 240 songs, and the 2GB shuffle holds about 500 songs, assuming an average of 4 minutes per song, using the AAC format at the High Quality setting for adding music.

The ultra-tiny pencil-thin third-generation 2GB or 4GB iPod shuffle is only 1.8 inches tall. Its built-in clip lets you attach it to almost anything. Apple moved its controls to the right earbud cord so that you can navigate through your songs easily without looking at the controls. A single button click on the earbud controls starts music playing, and a single click pauses the music that’s already playing. Click twice to go to the next track or three times to go to the previous track. You can use the earbud controls while running, driving, skiing, snowboarding, or even skydiving.

Another cool feature makes it even easier to use these earbud controls: The iPod shuffle talks to you with the VoiceOver feature. Press and hold the center button to hear the title and artist of the song, or hold it longer until you hear a tone, and then release to hear the names of playlists. After hearing the playlist you want, click once to select it (if you synchronized multiple playlists, as I describe in Chapter 8 of the printed edition). VoiceOver even tells you whether your battery needs charging.

The 2GB iPod shuffle holds about 500 songs, and the 4GB iPod shuffle holds about 1,000 songs, assuming an average of 4 minutes per song, using the AAC format at the High Quality setting for adding music (as described in Chapter 7 of the printed edition). The battery is the same for both third-generation models, offering up to 12 hours of power between charges.

Unlike other iPods, these iPod shuffle models can’t play tunes in the highest-quality Audio Interchange File Format (AIFF), WAV format, or Apple Lossless format, which consume a lot of storage space. See Bonus Chapter 2 for more details on encoding formats.

 

Using USB or FireWire Connections

Current iPod models, seventh-, sixth- and fifth-generation iPod models, the iPhone and iPod touch models, and the iPod shuffle models all use USB cables to connect to computers with USB 1.0, 1.1, or 2.0 connections. USB 2.0 is faster and also provides power to the iPod or iPhone. Most PCs and all Macs available today offer USB 2.0, so you don’t need to add anything.

FireWire is another high-speed connection and power cable, supported by older iPod generations for connecting and synchronizing with a computer. First- and second-generation models offer only a standard FireWire connection — you use a standard Mac-style FireWire cable to connect the iPod to the Mac’s FireWire connection. Plug the six-pin connector of a standard FireWire cable into the iPod, and plug the six-pin connector on the other end to the FireWire port on your Mac. (The six-pin connector is marked by the Y symbol that resembles a radiation symbol.)

You can use either a FireWire or a USB cable to connect a sixth- or fifth-generation iPod or iPod nano to the AC power supply, but you must use USB to synchronize these models with your computer. (You can’t use FireWire to charge current iPad, iPod, or iPhone models.)

Tip: The older USB 1.0 and 1.1 connections work for synchronizing an iPod or iPhone, but don’t provide power. If all you have is an older USB connection, you can use it to synchronize your sixth- or fifth-generation iPod, iPod shuffle, or iPod nano, and then use a FireWire cable (available from the Apple Store) to provide power by connecting it to a FireWire-compatible AC power adapter.

If you have a Windows PC without FireWire and an older model iPod that requires FireWire, you can add FireWire support to your PC. FireWire/IEEE 1394 expansion cards are available for PCs in various formats. Some offer the standard six-pin port found on Macs, and some offer a four-pin port that is also used in camcorders. If your card has a six-pin port, you can plug your iPod FireWire cable directly into it. The FireCard 400 CardBus card from Unibrain plugs into a PC desktop or laptop CardBus slot. (Laptop PCs made as far back as 1999 offer CardBus slots.) Desktop PCs typically let you add expansion cards inside the PC, and many IEEE 1394 expansion cards are available on the market. Before you buy a FireWire/IEEE 1394 card, make sure that it’s compatible with your hardware and operating system. Apple offers approved FireWire expansion cards at the online Apple Store.

For cards with four-pin ports, Apple provides the FireWire cable adapter, as shown in Figure BC1-5, and you can hook it up to the standard six-pin connector at the end of your FireWire cable. The small four-pin connector on the adapter plugs into the four-pin port on the FireWire card. Then plug the other end of your cable to your iPod or your dock. You can also purchase a special FireWire/IEEE 1394 cable that has a six-pin plug on one end and a four-pin plug on the other. Look for this type of cable in well-stocked electronics stores that sell digital camcorders because many camcorders use such a cable.

Tip: The FireWire cable adapter used to be supplied with full-size fourth-generation iPods. Unfortunately, it is no longer supplied with current models.

The original iPod shuffle has a USB connector on one end that plugs into a USB port like a USB cable. Just remove the cap from one end and connect it directly to the USB or USB 2.0 connection on your computer. You can also use an iPod shuffle Dock or a USB extension cable.

Both FireWire and USB 2.0 connections are plug-and-play: You can plug them in at any time whether your computer is on or off. Depending on the device that you use with these connections, FireWire or USB 2.0 can provide power to the device. For example, fourth- and fifth-generation iPods and iPod nanos can draw power from a USB 2.0 connection, and all (except the iPod shuffle models) can draw power from a FireWire connection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *