Apple and Apple Give Peace a Chance

Apple, Inc. (formerly Apple Computer) and Apple Records (the label for the Beatles) have finally laid to rest all legal problems involving use of the name “Apple” (according to a CNET News.com report by Caroline McCarthy). This marks an end to the long-running copyright feud between the two companies and replaces an earlier agreement that limited Apple Inc.’s abilities to distribute music.

Great news, but no Beatles music is available yet in the iTunes store except The Beatles & Tony Sheridan – In the Beginning (USA), which is a collection of songs recorded in Germany with Tony Sheridan, of “My Bonnie” fame, as lead singer (including “Ain’t She Sweet” sung by Lennon) — and obviously not a recording controlled by Apple Records.


The Beatles & Tony Sheridan - In the Beginning

The Beatles & Tony Sheridan – In the Beginning (USA)

Although we can only speculate how much influence, if any, Apple Records had on the formation of Apple Computer, we know that Steve Jobs likes the Beatles. But there are far more interesting connections and coincidences.

Start with the fact that Apple Records included an Apple Electronics division — way back in 1968 (other divisions included Apple Films, Apple Publishing, and Apple Retail). A friend of John Lennon called Magic Alex (alias Yanni Alexis Mardas) worked on all sorts of electronic devices for this division; not just audio recording equipment (some of which found its way into Apple Records’ basement recording studio and was used for some of the Let It Be album), but also light boxes and prototype consumer devices including an apple-shaped radio. He had impressed Lennon with his “nothing box”, a small plastic box with randomly blinking lights, and his ideas for futuristic electronic devices. It turned out that his main electronic experience had been as a TV repairman.

But Lennon and McCartney were serious about starting an alternative music, film, publishing, and electronics company. In addition to providing an umbrella to cover their financial and business affairs, Lennon and McCartney intended Apple to be an innovative company that would capitalize on worthwhile artistic projects. Above all, Apple epitomized the style of its era, as each new Beatles album broke new ground in music and cover art. McCartney came up with the name Apple Corps and the logo from a René Magritte painting. The following dialog from the 1968 press conference in New York to announce Apple Corps is particularly illuminating:

Interviewer to the Beatles: Could you tell us about your newest corporate business venture [Apple]?

John Lennon: It’s a business concerning records, films, and electronics and, as a sideline, manufacturing or whatever. We want to set up a system whereby people who just want to make a film about anything don’t have to go on their knees in somebody’s office, probably yours.

[ Interviewer asks more questions ]

John Lennon: The aim of this company [Apple] isn’t really a sack of gold teeth in the bank. We’ve done that bit. It’s more of a trick to see if we can actually get artistic freedom within a business structure, to see if we can create nice things and sell them without charging three times our cost.

Interviewer to the Beatles: How will you run your new company?

John Lennon: There’s people we can get to do that. We don’t know anything about business.

Interviewer to the Beatles: Will you sing a song for us?

John Lennon: No. Sorry, we need money first.

Apple Computer followed in Apple Corps’ footsteps a decade later, not only with a modified version of the logo but also with a sleek new style that invoked the Sixties (with metaphors of a “personal computer revolution”). Again, a company named Apple epitomized the style of its era. You can even faintly hear the influence of Beatles-style irreverent humor in Steve Jobs’ speeches. Both companies hired lots of designers and paid exquisite attention to style, and both companies fostered intense loyalty and dedication in their employees.

The first Apple nearly flamed out in the longest-running cocktail party ever, but it emerged decades later to serve up billions of dollars worth of Beatles content in the form of CDs and the Anthology series. The second Apple has emerged from oblivion to take on the largest consumer electronics companies in the world. The two are now at peace to capitalize on their revolutions.


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iTunes Pulls Over at Vista Point

Windows Vista has arrived, but folks using iTunes have to pull over — not to admire the view, but to fix authorization issues. Apple has released information in its Knowlege Base about iTunes running on Vista. Issues that occur with iTunes 7.0.2 on Vista include purchased songs not playing, iPod synch problems, iPod eject problems, failure to sync contacts and calendars with an iPod, and slow cover art animation.

The immediate solution fixes the problem of playing purchased songs (but not, apparently, the other problems). If you can’t wait for the next version of iTunes that will fix all the issues, and you’ve already installed Vista, download and run the iTunes Repair Tool for Vista after re-installing iTunes 7.0.2. The tool repairs permissions for files required by iTunes to play your iTunes Store purchases.

However, if you are brave and perhaps a bit foolish, try this fix I found in this thread of the Apple Support Discussion topic
(I can’t vouch for it; haven’t tried it):

From Vista, right click on the iTune.exe program icon located in the iTune folder in the Program File folder and select Properties. Click on the Compatibility tab and enable the “Run this program as an administrator” checkbox. Click on OK. Next time you run iTune it will automatically run under administrator privileges, this fixes the problem until Apple comes up with a Vista only version.

Meanwhile, here’s the official word from Apple on what to do if you are upgrading to Vista from Windows XP or 2000 and haven’t done it yet. Follow these seven steps to iTunes Vista heaven to ensure that iTunes performs adequately:

  1. Deauthorize all iTunes Store accounts.
  2. Enable Disk Use on all iPod models.
  3. Uninstall iTunes.
  4. Perform a clean install of Windows Vista (Highly recommended but not required).
  5. Reinstall the latest version of iTunes.
  6. Open iTunes.
  7. Choose Authorize Computer from the Store menu in iTunes.

That is all.

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A dedicated server should offer a reliable web hosting deal, that should have reliable domain registration. Offering website design templates is a free perk.

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iPhone a Platform in Infancy

“The iPhone guranteees there’ll be no video iPod for a long time,” writes Chris Howard in “Has the iPhone Killed the Video iPod?” (Apple Matters blog). The logic behind this idea is that Apple’s iPhone (last said to be available in June 2007) is hobbled as a PDA, not smart enough to compete against smart phones, and not phone-y enough to appeal to power mobile phone users (who hold them in one hand and use their thumbs). In short, Apple is using it to stick its toe into the phone market, but it really is just the next generation of the iPod video. With phone attached.

Is this right? My view is that Apple has established a design platform for launching new commercial devices, from less expensive iPhone models down the road to less expensive video-enabled iPods by this summer, all with larger touch-screen displays and gesture recognition. I agree with one comment to Howard’s post: “Apple would be stupid to invent such a groundbreaking technology (patent pending, no less) and only use it in one product.” Stay tuned for an onslaught of iPods that take advantage of all these new patents.

I agree that “mobile phone warriors” (to use Howard’s phrase) are mostly thumb-tuckers. They hold the phone in one hand and use their thumbs. The iPhone is mostly designed to be used with two hands (one for pointing, one for holding). But I don’t see that it would be impossible to still use the iPhone with one hand, and your thumb to press the interactive touch-screen. Besides, a segment of this market use Blackberry devices, and a segment of the Blackberry market (or future Blackberry market — as I am part of), could be lured away to a device that lets you type more easily with a Qwerty keyboard. Especially if it gives you the choice.

However, I am concerned about Howard’s point concerning the lack of third-party applications for the iPhone — but I don’t think this situation will last long. The first iPhone might be crippled in some ways, but it is a vast leap forward in design. I can imagine a variety of widgets and applications that will run on its version of OS X. This is a platform in infancy, waiting to be exploited in the next decade.

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Don’t Play Vista For Me

Microsoft Windows Vista has arrived. Hundreds (if not thousands) of blog entries are already posted about it. David Pogue of the New York Times pointed out that Microsoft has “deliberately exploited a weak spot in today’s court of public opinion: how bloggers influence consumers, but generally don’t have conflict-of-interest policies.”  He was referring to the news report that important bloggers had received Acer Ferrari laptops, which can sell for more than $2,200, from Microsoft. According to the New York Times, a spokeswoman for Microsoft confirmed that the company had sent out “about 90 computers to bloggers who write about technology and other subjects” to get them up to speed using Vista so that they can write their posts.

Well, here’s one blogger that didn’t get any free PC. Here are a few others — Fred Davis writes about a debate he participated in with Robert Scoble, Mac OSX vs. Windows Vista.

With eight editions of Windows Vista, one can expect confusion. If you eliminate the two specifically designed to cater to the European Union (with Windows Media technology removed) and the Starter edition for low-income countries (as defined by the World Bank), that leaves five. If you work at a large organization, chances are you’ll be using Windows Vista Enterprise, an edition available only through volume licensing deals for large organizations participating in Microsoft’s Software Assurance program. That leaves four. Of these, the least expensive (Home Basic) is not worth the effort for power Windows users, and the most expensive (Ultimate) and most desirable, at $399, is just too expensive. That leaves the Business and Home Premium editions, which are targeted to different types of customers.

And then there is the question of Vista’s touted security, even with the Ultimate edition. Webroot Software, as reported in The Guardian (“Virus warnings as Microsoft launches Vista” by Bobbie Johnson), announced that the new Windows Defender program failed to block 84% of viruses — including 15 of the most common pieces of malicious code. In any case, people who want to upgrade from Windows XP to Vista to improve security are in for a sticker shock. Only Windows Vista Ultimate — the most expensive edition — offers the maximum level of protection. Will the less expensive editions offer enough protection? Microsoft stands to gain from the confusion.

With Vista’s hardware requirements, upgrading an existing PC is problematic at best. But Vista is about buying a new computer. And you can bet that computer retailers are loading the less expensive versions. In fact, according to some reports, it is rare to find Vista Ultimate preloaded on new PCs. Dell, Gateway and HP charge $170, $160 and $120, respectively on top of what you already pay for Vista Home Premium.

So this is the choice Windows user have? “Upgrading to Vista is pretty expensive, not only the new software but often new hardware as well,” said Gartner analyst John Pescatore in “Experts: Don’t buy Vista for the security” by Joris Evers (CNET News.com). “If you put IE 7 on a Windows XP SP2 PC, along with the usual third-party firewall, antiviral and antispyware tools, you can have a perfectly secure PC if you keep up with the patches.”

If you keep up with the patches… Good luck with that!

P.S. Apple offers one desktop version of Mac OS X at a single price for individual copies. You pay $129 and get it all, compared to $399 for Windows Ultimate.

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Don’t Play Vista For Me

Microsoft Windows Vista has arrived. Hundreds (if not thousands) of blog entries are already posted about it. David Pogue of the New York Times pointed out that Microsoft has “deliberately exploited a weak spot in today’s court of public opinion: how bloggers influence consumers, but generally don’t have conflict-of-interest policies.”  He was referring to the news report that important bloggers had received Acer Ferrari laptops, which can sell for more than $2,200, from Microsoft. According to the New York Times, a spokeswoman for Microsoft confirmed that the company had sent out “about 90 computers to bloggers who write about technology and other subjects” to get them up to speed using Vista so that they can write their posts.

Well, here’s one blogger that didn’t get any free PC. Here are a few others — Fred Davis writes about a debate he participated in with Robert Scoble, Mac OSX vs. Windows Vista.

With eight editions of Windows Vista, one can expect confusion. If you eliminate the two specifically designed to cater to the European Union (with Windows Media technology removed) and the Starter edition for low-income countries (as defined by the World Bank), that leaves five. If you work at a large organization, chances are you’ll be using Windows Vista Enterprise, an edition available only through volume licensing deals for large organizations participating in Microsoft’s Software Assurance program. That leaves four. Of these, the least expensive (Home Basic) is not worth the effort for power Windows users, and the most expensive (Ultimate) and most desirable, at $399, is just too expensive. That leaves the Business and Home Premium editions, which are targeted to different types of customers.

And then there is the question of Vista’s touted security, even with the Ultimate edition. Webroot Software, as reported in The Guardian (“Virus warnings as Microsoft launches Vista” by Bobbie Johnson), announced that the new Windows Defender program failed to block 84% of viruses — including 15 of the most common pieces of malicious code. In any case, people who want to upgrade from Windows XP to Vista to improve security are in for a sticker shock. Only Windows Vista Ultimate — the most expensive edition — offers the maximum level of protection. Will the less expensive editions offer enough protection? Microsoft stands to gain from the confusion.

With Vista’s hardware requirements, upgrading an existing PC is problematic at best. But Vista is about buying a new computer. And you can bet that computer retailers are loading the less expensive versions. In fact, according to some reports, it is rare to find Vista Ultimate preloaded on new PCs. Dell, Gateway and HP charge $170, $160 and $120, respectively on top of what you already pay for Vista Home Premium.

So this is the choice Windows user have? “Upgrading to Vista is pretty expensive, not only the new software but often new hardware as well,” said Gartner analyst John Pescatore in “Experts: Don’t buy Vista for the security” by Joris Evers (CNET News.com). “If you put IE 7 on a Windows XP SP2 PC, along with the usual third-party firewall, antiviral and antispyware tools, you can have a perfectly secure PC if you keep up with the patches.”

If you keep up with the patches… Good luck with that!

P.S. Apple offers one desktop version of Mac OS X at a single price for individual copies. You pay $129 and get it all, compared to $399 for Windows Ultimate.

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I Have Little Walter’s “Juke” on My iPod…

I was taken aback by The Jukebox Station, blinking its colorful LEDs and drawing a small crowd around its booth at Macworld Expo 2007 in San Francisco.

It looks larger than it really is — only 40 inches tall — but the retro style and wood enclosure combined with the LED lighting system is just too cool.

The Jukebox Station from Saffire-USA (distributed by Pacific Rim Technologies) houses a universal docking cradle for any iPod along with an FM radio and CD player. If offers a stereo amplifier with 80 watts delivered into a five-speakers system (two magnetically-shielded tweeters, midrange drivers, and a six-inch subwoofer). It sounded good on the showroom floor.

The Jukebox Station comes with an IR remote to control audio volume and iPod functions from across the room. It has RCA and 3.5 mm mini input jacks to accept other music players and sources, and RCA output jacks to connect to another stereo or recording device, as well as a 3.5 mm mini output jack for headphones. RCA Video output jacks are provided to play your iPod videos and photo slideshows on a television.

Like I said, I was taken aback. The iPod looked so cute nestled within that culture shock of a docking speaker system. If I had room for it in my office, the $700 price would not be a deterrent. The Saffire-USA iPod summary page includes a photo of a tabletop model, “coming soon”.

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What’s the New Mary Jane?

Welcome to my blog, Tony Bove’s iTimes. We talk about what’s new and spectacular in personal technology; notably, the iPod and iTunes software for Windows PCs and Macs, the upcoming iPhone, and the world of accessories.

She catch Patagonian pancakes
With that one and gin party makes
She having all the ways good contacts
She making with Apple and contract.
Beatles, “What’s the New Mary Jane” (Lennon/McCartney), one of the missing Beatles songs released in the Anthology series.

I started writing something like a Web diary way back in 1996, before the blogosphere existed, titled What’s the New Mary Jane. The last “blog entry” in Sept. 2003 told about how my band, the Flying Other Brothers, had started a mini-tour. Like Bob Dylan’s infamous Never Ending Tour (which lasted at least five years, give or take a year), our tour seems like it will never stop; unlike Bob’s tour, ours did not sell out venues and generate cash rewards. Like touring, blogging can also seem like an endless chore with no return. I suffered Blog Depression way back in 1997, and posted less and less over time until I gave it up entirely.

Until now. This is a continuation of What’s the New Mary Jane. I promise to not waste your time. I’ll write only about things that I think will interest you.

Welcome back, Maryjane. What’s new?

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Calculating with Incense and Spreadsheets

It should come as no surprise to learn that the inventors of the spreadsheet and the first companies to market spreadsheet software were refugees from the Sixties counterculture. How often have you looked at a spreadsheet and thought, what were they smoking?

Before computers, paper ledgers were trusted because they weren’t so complicated that you couldn’t recalculate them by hand. But spreadsheets are far more complex, especially ones created in Excel that use multiple worksheets. The truth is a formula you can plug into a spreadsheet cell and never see again, nor question. Rows and columns of numbers seem accurate — but who really knows? You have to trust the spreadsheet maker and the program that made it, including its automatic formulas. But as spreadsheets proliferate through a company without any means of updating their information, they become multiple versions of the truth.

You want truth in a formula? Consider this spreadsheet:

Image of Excel spreadsheet

Truth depends on what formula you use. The cell range A1:A3 contains Boolean values (TRUE or FALSE). Add them up one way you get 2; add them up with the SUM function and you get 0.

The formula in cell A5 uses the addition operator. The sum of these three cells is 2. The conclusion: Excel treats TRUE as 1 and treats FALSE as 0. Except that it doesn’t: the formula in cell A6 uses Excel’s SUM function. In this case, the sum of these three cells is 0.

Note that OpenOffice.org Calc, an alternative, provides the correct answer — 2.

OpenOffice.org Calc, part of the free OpenOffice.org suite, offers the same set of analysis and graphic tools as Excel. OOo Calc runs on Windows, Linux, Sun Solaris, and Mac OS X, and can open and save spreadsheets in all Microsoft Office formats as well as the standard XML format.

Microsoft grudgingly accepts the fact that there are alternatives to Excel and lets you save worksheets and entire workbooks into some of the more popular formats with the formulas and calculations, sometimes even the formatting. Of course, every time you do this, Excel warns you that you may lose something in the process. The WK4, WK3, and FM3 formats for Lotus 1-2-3 work fine, but beware of Microsoft’s XML: You can save the entire workbook in this format, but you lose any charts and graphs, macro sheets, custom views, drawn object layers, outlines, scenarios, shared workbook information, Visual Basic projects, and user-defined function categories. You also can’t save password-protected worksheets. Good luck with that.

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Those students who have been through itil certification as well as ccna, still strive to get an mcsa certification. They must visit once actual tests website to get maximum results and details.

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Storm Hits Home

This is one to watch. And didn’t I warn you? The “Storm Worm” (as dubbed by F-Secure), which started in Europe during the onslaught of a real storm, has spread all over the world, affecting more home computers than business computers due to the fact that most businesses block attachments to emails (see “‘Storm Worm’ Trojan horse surges on” by Tom Espiner, Special to CNET News.com). People who open the attachment then unknowingly become part of a botnet. A botnet serves as an army of commandeered computers, which are later used by attackers without their owners’ knowledge.

The attachment is an executable file that opens a backdoor in a Windows XP PC and installs a rootkit (not unlike the infamous Sony rootkit) that hides the malicious code. The compromised PC becomes a zombie in a network called a botnet. While many botnets are centrally controlled and can be brought down by destroying the central server, the Storm Worm botnet acts like a peer-to-peer network with no central control.

According to the CNET News.com report, antivirus vendor Sophos called Storm Worm the “first big attack of 2007,” with code being spammed out from hundreds of countries.

Is Microsoft mobilizing its forces to stop these botnets? Not really. In the reality distortion field created by Microsoft that covers most of the planet, everyone should be merrily switching to Vista. So Microsoft is moving quickly to capture the antivirus share of the global Vista market with OneCare.

Think you can give your Windows XP PC shelter from this storm? Good luck with that.

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Pay Up! For the Vista Content Protection Racket

On the Sopranos, the Mafia controls the docks, the garbage trucks, the cops, the judges — the very infrastructure of the lives of those who live in Jersey. You can’t get anything in or out without their “help” and protection. Well folks, thanks to Microsoft, our content will live in a cyberspace Jersey.

Microsoft Vista includes Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology that acts as an enforcer with regard to protected content: it will shut down worldwide any equipment connected to Vista that is suspected of enabling a breach of content protection, and disable playback of anything that smells of protected content on equipment not sanctioned by Microsoft. I am not making this up.

An extensive report on Vista DRM-atology — “A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection” by Peter Gutmann in New Zealand — describes in detail how Vista’s DRM has turned into Hollywood’s Offer That You Can’t Refuse. Here’s a quick summary:

A protection racket for Microsoft’s Vista-licensed manufacturers. Vista stops protected content from playing on devices that don’t have Vista DRM content-protection facilities built in. What, you just bought high-end audio equipment that uses the currently popular S/PDIF (Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format) standard? Fuhgeddabout It! You won’t be able to use it with Vista and protected content. Here’s how Gutmann describes it:

Once a weakness is found in a particular driver or device, that driver will have its signature revoked by Microsoft, which means that it will cease to function (in informal terms, your device gets bricked, i.e. turned into a brick)… What this means is that a report of a compromise of a particular driver or device will cause all support for that device worldwide to be turned off until a fix can be found. If it’s an older device for which the vendor isn’t interested in rewriting their drivers (and in the fast-moving hardware market most devices enter “legacy” status within a year or two of their replacement models becoming available), all devices of that type worldwide become permanently unusable… If a particular piece of hardware is deactivated (even just temporarily while waiting for an updated driver to work around a content leak) and you swap in a different video card or sound card to avoid the problem, you risk triggering Windows’ anti-piracy measures, landing you in even more hot water.

A protection racket for protected content producers (Hollywood). Vista requires that any interface that provides high-quality output degrade the signal quality that passes through it if premium content is present. What, you expect your high-resolution monitor to show a crisp image? Fuhgeddabout It!  According to Gutmann:

This is done through a “constrictor” that downgrades the signal to a much lower-quality one, then up-scales it again back to the original spec, but with a significant loss in quality. So if you’re using an expensive new LCD display fed from a high-quality DVI signal on your video card and there’s protected content present, the picture you’re going to see will be, as the spec puts it, “slightly fuzzy”…  The same deliberate degrading of playback quality applies to audio, with the audio being downgraded to sound (from the spec) “fuzzy with less detail”. Amusingly, the Vista content protection docs say that it’ll be left to graphics chip manufacturers to differentiate their product based on (deliberately degraded) video quality. This seems a bit like breaking the legs of Olympic athletes and then rating them based on how fast they can hobble on crutches.

An endless scenario of security threats and reliability problems. Vista tries to detect hacks by looking for abnormalities in the hardware. Any little glitch that previously would have caused no change in operations — such as a voltage fluctuation or slight change in bus signals, or an unusual return code from a function call — can cause a system restart. What, you thought your Vista system would be more reliable, and that you wouldn’t need to pay more for protection? Fuhgeddabout It! Gutmann says:

Starting up or plugging in a bus-powered device may cause a small glitch in power supply voltages, or drivers may not quite manage device state as precisely as they think. Previously this was no problem — the system was designed with a bit of resilience, and things will function as normal. In other words small variances in performance are a normal part of system functioning. Furthermore, the degree of variance can differ widely across systems, with some handling large changes in system parameters and others only small ones… With the number of easily-accessible grenade pins that Vista’s content protection provides, any piece of malware that decides to pull a few of them will cause considerable damage. The homeland security implications of this seem quite serious, since a tiny, easily-hidden piece of malware would be enough to render a machine unusably unstable, while the very nature of Vista’s content protection would make it almost impossible to determine why the denial-of-service is occurring… Even without deliberate abuse by malware, the homeland security implications of an external agent being empowered to turn off your IT infrastructure in response to a content leak discovered in some chipset that you coincidentally happen to be using is a serious concern for potential Vista users.

A distribution channel controlled by Microsoft. The only reason Microsoft would go to all this trouble to set up such a restrictive DRM scheme is to completely own the channel and dictate terms to device manufacturers, content publishers, and consumers. Want an open alternative to the closed Apple iTunes model? Fuhgeddabout It!  According to Gutmann:

Not only will [Microsoft] be able to lock out any competitors, but because they will then represent the only available distribution channel they’ll be able to dictate terms back to the content providers whose needs they are nominally serving in the same way that Apple has already dictated terms back to the music industry: Play by Apple’s rules, or we won’t carry your content. The result will be a technologically enforced monopoly that makes their current de-facto Windows monopoly seem like a velvet glove in comparison.

So what has been the response to all this (besides a very funny cartoon by Philip Dorrell)?


Robert X. Cringely would have us all keep a stiff upper lip. “Digital Rights Management is really just an ecosystem for selling our own stuff to us again and again,” he points out in the I, Cringely column “Feeding Frenzy“: You should just get out your wallet. Vista is “entirely about getting people to buy new computers and that any lip service to upgrading current equipment is just that, lip service…”

If you want a Windows Vista media PC to deliver high-quality video and audio with no driver problems, just buy a new Windows Vista media PC from some big vendor like Dell, HP, or Sony and match it with other big-vendor stereo and video components that use strictly DRM-preserving HDMI connectors and therefore create no points of signal degradation along the path from hard disk to eye or ear.”

And yet, I agree with Cringely that Microsoft will ultimately not be successful, for two reasons:

Vista DRM will be cracked quickly. Cringely puts it best:

Vista [DRM] will fail because the job it is attempting to do is too hard, because Microsoft isn’t especially good at these huge integration jobs, and because there is a smart hacker community determined to break Vista [DRM] over and over again, which it will.”

Microsoft relies too much on Hollywood. Many of Vista’s DRM technologies exist because large movie studios, record labels and cable television networks want them. Meanwhile, user-generated content is on the rise while Hollywood’s content is becoming less important. The new content providers that gave YouTube its popularity, and the social networks that provide measurable niche markets, will have no use for DRM.

Matt Rosoff, lead analyst at research firm Directions On Microsoft, thinks that Vista DRM does not bode well for new content formats such as Blu-ray and HD-DVD, neither of which are likely to survive their association with DRM technology. As quoted in Computerworld’s “Vista and More: Piecing Together Microsoft’s DRM Puzzle” by Matt McKenzie, Rosoff says Vista DRM is “so consumer-unfriendly that I think it’s bound to fail — and when it fails, it will sink whatever new formats content owners are trying to impose.”

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